Governance Structure

Excerpt from the report entitled

A Governance Model for Archery Canada

Report prepared by Paul Jurbala (Consultant)

Approved by Board of Directors, August 7, 2013

 

3.1       OVERVIEW

The governance structure recommended to Archery Canada and approved by the Board of Directors is an attempt to compromise between some of the conflicting considerations listed above, while meeting the requirements for compliance with the new Act. Unsurprisingly, the model resembles some currently being discussed by other Canadian NSOs- see for example Rowing Canada. Some key features of the model include:

  1. The model recommends a single class of members: PSOs, with one vote each at member meetings. This model is simple and eliminates the risk of “special class votes”.
  2. The PSO representatives also convene as a PSO Council from four to six times per year, likely by web or conference call, to act as a sounding board and advisory group to the Board. The main function of the PSO Council is to facilitate two-way communication with Archery Canada and facilitate coordination of policy and programs. The Council makes recommendations, not decisions: to make decisions the members must convene a member’s meeting, according to the bylaws.
  3. The Board of Directors is restructured, and no longer includes PSO representatives. The new Board is essentially the same as the current Executive Committee. This change to the Board structure also eliminates appointed and ex officio Directors.
  4. Because Directors cannot be appointed, it is proposed that the High Performance Committee conduct a process to identify and select Athlete Representative(s), and that/those individual(s) stand for unopposed election at the Annual General Meeting, according to term limits.
  5. Note that in the new Act, Directors and committee members do not have to be Archery Canada members (i.e. PSOs). In the recommended model, Director candidates are recruited from the Archery community by the Human Resources Committee, which has functions including those of a Nominating Committee.  An additional option is to designate a pool of “Registered Participants” as the current members of Archery PSOs, and draw Director and possibly candidates only from that pool. Alternately, Director and other committee volunteer candidates can simply be drawn from a wider pool of any interested persons, from within or outside Archery.
  6. Finance and Audit, Human Resources, and Marketing and Communication committees reporting to the Board and chaired by Directors are added consistent with the directions of the strategic plan. The Human Resources committee, chaired by the President, has the key roles of recruitment and creation of policies, job descriptions, and practices favoring volunteer participation and retention. The High Performance and 3D High Performance Archery committees, reporting to the Board, are retained. The retention of a renamed 3D-HP committee was felt by the Executive Committee to be important to ensure sufficient support for continued 3D Archery activity.
  7. A new Development Committee is proposed, consistent with the Development pillar and focus of the strategic plan. Current Coach Development, Officials and LTAD Committees now report to the Development Committee, as does a new Events Committee created to manage Archery Canada’s roles in promoting, sanctioning, regulating and planning national and international events held in Canada.
  8. The former Rules Committee will now be an ad-hoc (not standing) committee and will report to the Officials Committee. In general at this level, contracts with volunteers or paid contractors will be used to move operational activities forward, and the leaders will form their own working groups within their terms of reference.

Overall this is a relatively “lightweight” flexible structure that maintains many existing committee and Director roles, yet adds critical new committees and complies with the new Act. A schematic of the membership and committee structure follows:

 

Approved by Board of Directors, August 7, 2013

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